Category Archives: Articles

“This Muslim Convert Is Changing The Conversation About Women In Islam With Music And Humor” – Ambassador Akbar Ahmed, Huffington Post

COPENHAGEN, Denmark ― Annette Bellaoui remembers the moment well. She was meeting a leading politician in the Danish People’s Party, known for its anti-Muslim rhetoric. He stared at her, “seriously contemplating” Bellaoui in a way that seemed as though he was asking himself, “‘does this woman have hand grenades in her pockets?’”

“There was fear and anger and everything in his face,” she recalled. “And, do you know what I did? I smiled at him, my sweetest smile.” And then she blew a kiss.

Bellaoui, a 58-year-old Dane who converted to Islam nearly two decades ago, giggles when she tells this story. She’s wholeheartedly aware that the reaction to a likely incident of Islamophobia is an unorthodox one, especially for a woman in a hijab who also goes by the name Fatima Zahra. But that’s precisely why she did it.

To continue reading, click here.


“This Muslim Convert Is Prepping The Next Batch Of Muslim Scholars To Be More In Tune With UK Society” – Ambassador Akbar Ahmed, The Huffington Post

CAMBRIDGE, England ― When Tim Winter became a Muslim in 1979, Islam was still something of a mystery to the West. He was a 19-year-old undergraduate student at Cambridge University and a self-described “freelance monotheist.”

Today, Winter, a 57-year-old native Londoner who also goes by the name Shaykh Abdal Hakim Murad, faces a much different reality. Islam has grown to one of the largest religions in Europe, and with it, Islamophobia.

Winter, keenly aware of this new reality, is tackling it head-on. As one of Europe’s most prominent Islamic scholars and dean of the Cambridge Muslim College, he spends his days training graduates of Britain’s top Islamic seminaries to better navigate and engage with British society.

To continue reading, click here.

“This Self-Described ‘Hillbilly’ Muslim Convert Is A Refreshing Link Between Islam And His Danish Culture” – Ambassador Akbar Ahmed, Huffington Post

COPENHAGEN, Denmark ― Imam Abdul Wahid Pedersen first began to spiritually connect to the Islamic faith on a mountain in the holy temple town of Hampi, India in the summer of 1977. It would be about five years before Pedersen, then a 23-year-old convert to Hinduism, would become Muslim, but the experience left him profoundly changed.

“Time seemed to stand still, and I was totally lost in that feeling for as long as it lasted,” he said. “It would, nevertheless, take another few years before my brain and heart fully understood this message, and I surrendered to Allah.”

Pedersen had been on a quest for greater spiritual understanding, climbing up a mountain toward a temple at the top when it had happened. It was a moonlit night, and as the chanting echoed above, he had stopped for a drink of water at a small stream along the way. The opening was so low that he had had to bend down in order to catch the trickle. Laying on the ground, he had stretched his hand forward towards the water. At that moment, with the moon on the mountains, he realized that, “God wanted me to lie flat in front of him.” When he did so, Pedersen had unintentionally completed a prostration before God.

To continue reading, click here.

Building bridges in divisive times – Aijaz Zaka Syed, Gulf News

Dr Akbar Ahmad is a man of many parts. Civil servant, diplomat, author, filmmaker (creator of the biopic Jinnah) and teacher, he has also served as Pakistan’s ambassador to the United Kingdom. Currently Ibn Khaldun Chair of Islamic Studies and Professor of International Relations at the American University in Washington, it is his extraordinary insight into Muslim societies around the world and contribution as a scholar of Islam that truly set him apart from his tribe.

Distinguished author of such groundbreaking books as Postmodernism and Islam, Predicament and Promise (1992), Living Islam — From Samarkand to Stornoway (1993), Discovering Islam, Making Sense of Muslim History and Society (2002), and Islam Today: A Short Introduction to the Muslim World (2002) that came out in the tumultuous post-9/11 era to underscore the pacifist and humanist teachings of Islam, he is a living and walking encyclopedia on contemporary Muslim societies.

Given the unprecedented double-edged challenge of extremism and Islamophobia facing Islam and Muslims, it is only natural that Professor Ahmad has constantly written and spoken about it, analysing often for the benefit of western audiences the underlying causes and historical drivers of violence and radicalisation, as he most recently did in The Thistle and the Drone: How America’s War on Terror Became a Global War on Tribal Islam (2013).

To continue reading, click here.

Pakistani-American Professor Wins Scholar-Teacher of the Year Award – Patrick Burnett, The Huffington Post

Muslims continue to face attacks from all directions in today’s America. The Council on American-Islamic relations recently released their annual report on Islamophobic attacks, finding a 57 percent increase in attacks on Muslims in 2016 from the prior year. The trend does not appear to be abating in 2017. Just last week, a video of a Muslim woman being harassed in line at a Northern Virginia Trader Joe’s went viral, showcasing how some now feel comfortable casually harassing Muslims over their faith in the middle of a grocery store. Meanwhile, an Oregon man was just arrested after threatening to kill worshipers at a mosque, and a Muslim family on a beach in Texas was recently subjected to an Islamophobic tirade by a self-proclaimed Trump supporter. To say it is a challenging time for Muslims in America would be an understatement.

Thankfully, there are bright spots for American Muslims in this toxic environment. On May 10, as part of the annual American University School of International Service (SIS) End-of-Year Celebration at the Maggiano’s Chevy Chase in Washington, DC, Ambassador Akbar Ahmed, the Ibn Khaldun Chair of Islamic Studies at American University (AU), was awarded the 2016-17 SIS Scholar/Teacher of the Year award. As a leading faculty member of SIS, one of the top ten schools of international affairs in the US, Ahmed received this award in recognition of his “innovative and important scholarship as well as [his] dedicated, rigorous, and inspiring mentoring of our students and [his] service to our community.” Joined by several members of his family, including his wife, Zeenat, his two sons, Babar and Umar, his daughter-in-law Melody, and two of his grandsons, Alexander and Gabriel, along with two key members of his research team, Frankie Martin and myself, for the ceremony, Ahmed received this prestigious award before a full house and a standing ovation of SIS staff and faculty.

To continue reading, click here.

What Christianity and Islam have in common – Harrison Akins, The Tennessean

There are many people today who argue Islam and Christianity are locked in a civilizational war, a view that has become a rationale for a number of the Trump administration’s policies.

This argument, however, is an inaccurate and simplistic assessment of the relationship between these two faiths. Quite distinct from the apocalyptic struggle many espouse, an examination of the foundations of the Islamic faith shows respect for Christianity.

Islam is part of the same Abrahamic tradition as Christianity. Key figures within the Bible — Abraham (Ibrahim), Moses (Musa), Mary (Maryam), and Jesus (Isa) among others — are all respected prophets and figures within Islam. There is a chapter in the Quran about Mary and, within the Quran, Jesus is the only person who can perform miracles.

To continue reading, click here.

A Friendship Across Civilizations – Anna Brosius, The Huffington Post

Imagine these scenes: a newscaster portrays grim events of a policeman being hacked to death by a Muslim, who in turn is shot by police. Riots by nationalist groups fill streets with smoke and flames as if from an apocalyptic drama. A menacing man brandishes a machete toward a screen, with a voice over retelling the terrible threats he is making. These bleak and frightening images open the film, Journey into Europe, a documentary on Islam in Europe and the place of Islam in European history and civilization produced by Ambassador Akbar Ahmed, the Ibn Khaldun Chair of Islamic Studies at American University and the former Pakistani High Commissioner to the UK and Ireland. Meanwhile, newspapers nearly every day flash with bombings and shootings which target Christian minorities in many Muslim majority countries. Whether in London or Lahore, Muslim-Christian tension all too often violently spills onto the streets of cities throughout the world. Many in both the West and the Muslim world would say that these horrific events show that Islamic and Western identities are incompatible, and that it is impossible for Christians and Muslims to coexist with peace and mutual respect.

However, in this world of sorrow and bloodshed, I have been privileged to witness the incredible friendship between Ahmed, a Muslim Pakistani who now calls America his home, and James Shera, a British Christian Pakistani. The affection and generosity of spirit which they have extended towards one another challenges this very narrative of hostility and hatred between the Muslim world and the West, Christians and Muslims.

To continue reading, click here.

Transcending Interfaith Fear – Patrick Burnett, The Huffington Post

Minority faith communities are undergoing great stress in today’s America. Over the past several months, Jewish cemeteries, synagogues, and even a Jewish museum have been vandalized across the country, while Jewish community centers have received a litany of bomb threats. One rabbi in Seattle, whose synagogue of 16 years was graffitied with such slogans as, “Holocaust is fake history,” remarked, “in my time, there’s been nothing like this.” Meanwhile, a number of mosques across the country, from Colorado to Michigan, have been threatened, vandalized, and even torched. Mosques across the country are now even being advised to set up security cameras and hire security guards in response to this disturbing trend. In the same vein, an active-shooter training was recently held in a suburban Baltimore mosque in response to these incidents. Clearly we are barreling down a slippery slope that can only end in disaster if it is unchecked at the highest levels of our society.


Though while the picture may be bleak for minorities across the country, not all hope is lost for our nation’s diverse faiths. In the face of this tension, fear, and angst, an interfaith spirit persists in many corners of America. It was in this light that on Friday, March 24, Ambassador Akbar Ahmed, the Ibn Khaldun Chair of Islamic Studies at American University, was invited to address Congregation B’nai Tzedek in Potomac, Md. as the synagogue’s first-ever Muslim speaker. Congregation B’nai Tzedek, a prominent Montgomery County Conservative synagogue, is led by founder Rabbi Stuart Weinblatt, who is also the current President of the Rabbinic Cabinet of the Jewish Federations of North America, “the central address of North American Jewry.”

To continue reading, click here.

“If Trump Wants To Win In The Muslim World, He Needs To Know This History” – Ambassador Akbar Ahmed, Huffington

U.S. President Donald Trump has emphasized that a central focus of his administration will be to wipe the so-called Islamic State “from the face of the Earth.” Key presidential advisers like Steve Bannon have spoken of Islam as the enemy of the United States and the West. And now Trump has signed a second Muslim-focused travel ban involving six nations ― a list that could expand ― following his campaign pledge to ban all Muslims from the United States, at least temporarily. He desperately needs to reassess his mindset if he wants to be successful.

The president is aware, as he said in his address to Congress, of the need to work with “allies in the Muslim world” in order to genuinely combat the problem of global terrorism. Yet this will be impossible if Trump continues to antagonize the world’s Muslims, including American allies. Demonizing Islam and issuing bans on citizens from Muslim-majority countries are not only ineffective ways to fight terrorism, but they also alienate valuable partners who find such Islamophobic rhetoric and actions humiliating and counter to many of their cherished cultural and tribal codes of honor, dignity and hospitality.

Instead, Trump and his administration should pursue a different tactic ― one that looks to win the hearts and minds of the larger Muslim community. Only then will he have the diverse scope to take on the threat posed by ISIS and groups like it. To do this, President Trump should draw from a relevant portion of history some eight centuries ago ― the acquisition of Jerusalem by the legendary Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II at the height of the Crusades through peaceful and diplomatic means.

To continue reading, click here.

Pluralist America Marches Forward

Many Americans have been rattled by President Trump’s recent Executive Order, which temporarily banned the admission of all refugees and most non-citizens from seven majority-Muslim nations before being suspended by a U.S. District Court. Protests erupted across the nation in the immediate aftermath of the Order’s signing, from Pennsylvania Ave., to Omaha, Neb., to Los Angeles International Airport, while many legal visitors and residents of the US caught in the crossfire of the Executive Order sat detained in airports all across the country. A recent town hall meeting at a mosque in Silver Spring, Md. underscored the deep fear gripping the American Muslim community, with some attendees wondering whether they were seeing parallels to the Holocaust. The tears of the Statue of Liberty are flooding the continent.

In the midst of controversies surrounding this travel ban, many Americans remain committed to welcoming and acquainting themselves with their Muslim brothers and sisters. This sentiment is clearly visible in suburban Chevy Chase, Md., less than ten miles from the White House. On January 29, two days after the refugee and travel ban was enacted, Ambassador Akbar Ahmed, the Ibn Khaldun Chair of Islamic Studies at American University, drew a standing-room-only audience, including several ambassadors, at St. John’s Norwood Episcopal Church during their Adult Education Hour to discuss contemporary Islam in the US, with a particular eye towards current political developments.

The Episcopal Diocese of Washington, of which St. John’s Norwood is a member, has played a very active role in standing up for immigrants and refugees around the globe and calling for the US to reopen its arms for those in need. On January 28, just one day before Ahmed’s lecture, the Episcopal Diocese of Washington released their “Resolution to Reaffirm the Church’s Commitment to Social Justice in a Divisive Political Climate”, which calls upon the Diocese to “reaffirm that we believe that every person is created in God’s image, imbued and blessed with inherent dignity and worth.” The Resolution goes on to state, “We welcome all people in our communities of faith and support other communities of faith, including particularly Muslim communities who may fear persecution.”

To continue reading, click here.